We have been getting a lot of questions about “gun trusts” lately, especially with Congress and the media focused on potential gun control legislation.  Holding firearms within trusts has become necessary and desirable due to the strict rules contained in the National Firearms Act (NFA) regarding certain types of firearms.

Firearms are truly a unique type of property; they can be very valuable, whether monetarily, sentimentally, or both.  They are also dangerous, as recognized by the NFA.  These characteristics of guns, as well as the strict regulations they may be subject to, mean that it is essential to properly plan for their ownership and transfer.

A “gun trust” can, if done correctly, address the issues of owning firearms during your life and passing them on to your loved ones after you are gone.  However, just like other types of trusts, you should beware the inexpensive, “bare bones” version from an attorney who asks you only a few questions and just fills in a form.

The actual language of the trust is very important for compliance with the NFA.  Also, proper counseling is necessary so that you can consider and discuss topics such as who should act as successor trustee (he or she will have physical possession of your firearms) and whether you should require your beneficiaries (who will use or receive the firearms) to get training beforehand.

Because we believe in comprehensive estate planning, we are happy to create trusts which hold firearms for our clients.  However, we will only do “gun trusts” as part of the Cramer Law Center process to ensure that we are able to provide proper counseling and draft a trust that will work for you and your family.

We have been getting a lot of questions about “gun trusts” lately, especially with Congress and the media focused on potential gun control legislation.  Holding firearms within trusts has become necessary and desirable due to the strict rules contained in the National Firearms Act (NFA) regarding certain types of firearms.

 Firearms are truly a unique type of property; they can be very valuable, whether monetarily, sentimentally, or both.  They are also dangerous, as recognized by the NFA.  These characteristics of guns, as well as the strict regulations they may be subject to, mean that it is essential to properly plan for their ownership and transfer.

A “gun trust” can, if done correctly, address the issues of owning firearms during your life and passing them on to your loved ones after you are gone.  However, just like other types of trusts, you should beware the inexpensive, “bare bones” version from an attorney who asks you only a few questions and just fills in a form.

The actual language of the trust is very important for compliance with the NFA.  Also, proper counseling is necessary so that you can consider and discuss topics such as who should act as successor trustee (he or she will have physical possession of your firearms) and whether you should require your beneficiaries (who will use or receive the firearms) to get training beforehand.

Because we believe in comprehensive estate planning, we are happy to create trusts which hold firearms for our clients.  However, we will only do “gun trusts” as part of the Cramer Law Center process to ensure that we are able to provide proper counseling and draft a trust that will work for you and your family.

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